A Boutique Experience at Sutton

It’s not often all of the weather people I follow get it so wrong. What should have been a nice blast of snow with some mixed precipitation, fell as freezing rain, before finally changing over.

The extra day it took me to get there turned out to be worth it on many levels. Sutton is a day trip from Montreal, but you have to pass a couple of other hills to get there. Still no matter shape things are in, I always feel like I’m a world away. It’s like a destination daytrip for me.

The weather is alive at the northernmost tip of the Green Mountain spine and you just never know what’s going on top of the hill. The locals know that the weather in town often means nothing, at all.

Continue reading

Mont Sutton, Amen

Most of the billboards in The Townships are in French. There’s a conspicuous one near the top of Mont Sutton’s access road that simply says “Amen” branded with the logo and a picture of some beautifully rimed trees.

mont-sutton-skier

It’s a little ambiguous, but after skiing there last weekend, I’d probably define it as “divine bliss and sheer joyfulness from sliding over a soft base of perfection.” Skiing is serious business, after all.

Overstatement? Je ne sais pas. While it hadn’t snowed at the mountain for a few days, life is more than recent snowfall, uphill capacity, double black diamonds, and super fast lifts. Sutton seems to get the fact that those metrics don’t directly translate into fun. From heaven, not hoses, en français.

Continue reading

Sutton on a Sunny Afternoon

I tossed the hiking shoes in my trunk as an afterthought while heading to Quebec, but then quickly considered it to be the right decision. Unlike skiing or hiking, climbing is not the best way to familiarize yourself with a new place, so it made sense to fall back on the classic activity while in the Sutton region of Quebec.

Sutton-prive

This charming area, known as the Canton l’Est to the Quebecois (aka the Eastern Townships to us), is like a French speaking mirror of the Green Mountains on the other side of the border, though the mountains are not as tall as the US section of the spine, and they don’t stretch out in the same north-south orientation.

So while these peaks aren’t as rugged, they do feel at least as remote. From any peak in the area you can see rolling hills stretching in all directions. The mountains were also sculpted by the same glacial forces as those that cut Jay Peak and Mansfield and many share the same pyramid-shaped summit.

Continue reading